Tag Archives: Project Management

But how do you *know*?

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The case for (and against) testability There’s an old saying in the ad world, attributed to John Wanamaker: ‘Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half’. Designing systems can feel a lot like this – agonising for hours over which features people will find valuable, which […]

Signature focus

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The focus of signatories on a piece of work rises exponentially as the point of their signature approaches. We sometimes hear; ‘the boss doesn’t read anything until the last minute, and then he wants a load of changes.’ Its frustrating, but its also human nature – the busier we are, the thinner our attention is […]

The network effect in projects

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In 1980 Robert Metcalfe, the inventor of the Ethernet standard for connecting computers over a short distance, developed a theory that came to be known as Metcalfe’s Law: The value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of connected users of the system. Essentially this means that the greater the […]

The Search for Meaning

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Problems in projects arise from a lack of shared understanding, not (necessarily) a lack of governance. This absence of understanding leads to a lack of meaning for those managing a project; meaning being exactly what is needed to decide how to manage the work effectively.  In our experience, successful implementation is enabled by understanding a […]

Lost in Translation

Lost in Translation

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The more parties there are in a project, the greater the translation overhead. When someone commissions a piece of work, they have a vision in their mind’s eye of what they’ll be getting at the end of the process. When you’re commissioning a painting or a sculpture, you want to be surprised and delighted by […]

Progress Abstraction

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Methodologies can be great – they can provide a framework for progress and success, but they are not guarantees. PRINCE2, MSP, PMP, APM are all frameworks that provide the disciplines to manage projects and programmes effectively through definition (scope, plans), logs (risks, issues, dependencies), and governance (meetings, reports, and so on). At the water cooler […]